golden kugel recipe springform
Magdalena O'Neal
AuthorMagdalena O'Neal

I knew food would play a large part in my life when I started to plan said life around meals. From planning get-togethers with friends around dinner, making sweets for birthdays, or simple brunches with family, food has been my love language for as long as I can remember. When I recall some of the most defining moments of my childhood there is a plate of food in the center of the table that I can smell and taste if I close my eyes. The dish that filled my nostrils with seasonal joy each March when I was younger was always my grandmother’s kugel. Growing up in a Jewish household, my family didn’t frequent Temple but was always eager and excited to gather for Hanukkah and Passover meals and celebrations. As a kid I remember lying in bed thinking about the door being left open for spirits to come in and nibble at our leftovers. At least I think that’s what it was for; I was too busy eating parsley dipped in saltwater as though it was an appetizer and splashing wine on my plate in an attempt to make my own version of a Passover Pollock.

Kugel is a funny sort of dish that might not seem all too appealing if you’ve never eaten it and only read the ingredients. It’s a combination of cottage cheese, cream, egg noodles, sugar, and raisins; you bake it like a casserole. While it’s a sweet side, it can be served alongside savory dishes—I often eat it as a dish on its own or for a dessert that isn’t too sweet year-round. In an effort to add a more appealing look to the noodle kugel (which is actually very fun to say out loud), I generously buttered a springform pan, sprinkled some sugar across the top to create a crispy layer, and baked it until the tips of the exposed noodles were golden brown. Pop the springform mold off and you’ve got what we could call.. a kugel cake! While it tastes almost exactly the same as my grandma’s, legend has it that we eat with our eyes, so why not make the pan swap for a more eye-catching centerpiece for Passover this weekend?

How to Make It

1

In a small saucepan add juice from oranges and raisins. Cook over medium heat until liquid is bubbling and raisins begin to plump.

2

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. and generously butter a springform pan.

3

Bring a pot of water to a boil and cook according to package directions. Drain and toss with butter while noodles are warm.

4

Add remaining ingredients to a large bowl and whisk to combine. Add raisins and reduced juice along with buttered noodles to the bowl and mix together. Pour mixture into the springform pan and sprinkle the top with the remaining tablespoon of sugar. Bake for 30 minutes until the top of the kugel is browned evenly.

5

Remove from oven and let cool for 20-30 minutes before running a knife along the edges of the pan to loosen the sides. Gently remove the outer ring from the pan and serve kugel warm or at room temperature.

Ingredients

 ½ cup golden raisins
 2 oranges, juiced (plus 1 tablespoon of zest)
 1 lb egg noodles
 4 eggs
 3 cups cottage cheese
 1 cup greek yogurt
  cup sugar (plus 1 tablespoon)

Directions

1

In a small saucepan add juice from oranges and raisins. Cook over medium heat until liquid is bubbling and raisins begin to plump.

2

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. and generously butter a springform pan.

3

Bring a pot of water to a boil and cook according to package directions. Drain and toss with butter while noodles are warm.

4

Add remaining ingredients to a large bowl and whisk to combine. Add raisins and reduced juice along with buttered noodles to the bowl and mix together. Pour mixture into the springform pan and sprinkle the top with the remaining tablespoon of sugar. Bake for 30 minutes until the top of the kugel is browned evenly.

5

Remove from oven and let cool for 20-30 minutes before running a knife along the edges of the pan to loosen the sides. Gently remove the outer ring from the pan and serve kugel warm or at room temperature.

Springform Kugel