Cassie Winslow, an expert on edible flowers and author of cookbook ‘Floral Provisions,’ teaches us how to make—and grow—our own floral brunch, from lavender crêpes to apricot-chamomile jam.

Lavender Crepes with Lavender Pluot Sauce recipe from Floral Provisions cookbook

Naomi McColloch

Adapted from Floral Provisions: 45+ Sweet and Savory Recipes by Cassie Winslow with Permission from Chronicle Books, 2022. Photographs © Naomi McColloch

Like a lot of other folks, Cassie Winslow moved during the pandemic. She and her family packed up their life in Santa Cruz and headed to the Sacramento Valley to be closer to loved ones and have a bit more room. Unlike a lot of other folks, they spent the first few months planting more than 70 rose bushes around their new home.

Winslow’s husband is the green thumb of the pair, but she is the one who’s garnered a following for her ability to transform seemingly simple dishes and drinks into botanical showpieces on her stunning Instagram and blog @decotartelette, and in her first book, where she showed us how to add beautiful edible flowers to cocktails. Now she’s back with Floral Provisions: 45+ Sweet and Savory Recipes, a cookbook full of tips for leveling up everyday meals with a fragrant twist, from lavender crêpes to apricot-chamomile jam. While there are so many varieties of edible flowers, Winslow features those that are easy to source or grow at home.

Floral Provisions cookbook book cover
Adapted from Floral Provisions:
45+ Sweet and Savory Recipes
by Cassie Winslow with Permission
from Chronicle Books, 2022.
Photographs © Naomi McColloch

“Lavender and chamomile are quite versatile and tend to require minimal maintenance,” Winslow writes. “Nasturtium is also quite lovely, and if it grows well in your area, it can fill your garden with gorgeous blooms year-round.”

Because we like a sweet start to the day, we found ourselves drawn to the breakfast dishes in Floral Provisions, which we’ve excerpted here complete with sauces, butters, and salts made with all types of botanicals.

“Fresh flowers tend to have a very subtle flavor,” Winslow tells us. “When they’re dried, the flavor is more potent.”

Incorporating botanicals can add not only new fragrances to your family classics but also vibrantly colored garnishes and, well, some joy. “Just have fun with it and experiment,” Winslow says. “I’ll be surprised if it doesn’t bring a smile to your face.”


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