Use these versatile and stunning succulents for adding drama to pots and sunny gardens

Sunset  – August 11, 2006 | Updated July 21, 2019

When Sunset published its book Succulents and Cacti in 1970, agaves definitely took a back seat to sedums—there were only about a half dozen species mentioned. Now, we could fill a whole book on these knockouts alone. Growing beautiful agave plants has never been easier — there’s a variety for every garden and more choices than ever. Grow them alone as a specimen for dramatic statement, or combine with other succulents for a stunning sea creature landscape. Check out these agave images for inspiration (or just because they’re drop-dead gorgeous) and pick up a few tips for how to grow them while you’re at it.

All agaves do best in full sun and sandy, well-drained soil, and thrive on the scantest amount of water. Some are more cold-tolerant than others, but they can’t handle damp cold. When they do bloom — a rare feat — these slow-growing yucca-cousins eject a giant asparagus-looking flower spike straight to the heavens

If you want more pointers on how to grow agave, check out thesecare tips.