Frijoles de Olla
Reprinted with permission from Caren Rideau: Kitchen Designer, Vintner, Entertaining at Home. Photographs by Meghan Beierle-O’Brien. Produced and styled by Char Hatch Langos. Published by Pointed Leaf Press.
Yields 6 Servings
AuthorCaren Rideau

Growing up amid Mexican culture, there was always a pot of beans, or frijoles de la olla on the stove, says California-based winemaker and entertainer Caren Rideau.

This recipe and others like it can be found in the article “Ever Wondered What to Drink with Tacos? This Vintner Can Help.”

How to Make It

1

Bring beans and 4 qts. water to a boil in a large pot. Reduce heat to medium-low, add salt, and simmer gently, stirring occasionally. Add more water as needed to keep beans covered while cooking them for about 2 to 3 1⁄2 hours, depending on how old the beans are. Adjust salt as needed. I like a minimum of 2 cups of the remaining broth in the cooked beans.

2

Serve alone or garnish with fresh chile, cilantro, and feta cheese. 


Ingredients

 1 lb dried pinto beans, rinsed and picked through
 2 tsp kosher salt
 1 fresno or serrano chile, finely sliced (optional)
 chopped cilantro (optional)
 crumbled feta cheese (optional)

Directions

1

Bring beans and 4 qts. water to a boil in a large pot. Reduce heat to medium-low, add salt, and simmer gently, stirring occasionally. Add more water as needed to keep beans covered while cooking them for about 2 to 3 1⁄2 hours, depending on how old the beans are. Adjust salt as needed. I like a minimum of 2 cups of the remaining broth in the cooked beans.

2

Serve alone or garnish with fresh chile, cilantro, and feta cheese. 


Caren Rideau’s Frijoles de Olla