21 great garden & harvest tools

Let this fresh crop of design-savvy planters, tools, and harvest helpers add some spark to your gardening

Gardening gloves

Photo by E. Spencer Toy; written by Julie Chai

Gardening gloves

West County Gardener’s landscape gloves are supple enough for planting, and reinforced with Kevlar for tougher chores too. $32; westcountygardener.com

Nonstick shovel

Photo by E. Spencer Toy; written by Julie Chai

Nonstick shovel

Muddy clay soil sticks to most shovels. But it slides right off this perforated one, which makes big digging tasks a cinch. Toolite round point D-grip shovel, $73; midwestrake.com

Lightweight hose

Photo by E. Spencer Toy; written by Julie Chai

Lightweight hose

The Slim & Light hose is lead-free, so you don’t have to worry if people or pets drink from it. From $35 for 25-ft. length; waterrightinc.com

All-purpose bucket

Photo by E. Spencer Toy; written by Julie Chai

All-purpose bucket

We use the flexible Tubtrug for everything, from carrying tools and soil to carting clippings to the compost pile. From $11 for 13-in. diameter; tubtrugs.com

Ergonomic hand tools

Photo by E. Spencer Toy; written by Julie Chai

Ergonomic hand tools

These essentials come in bright colors that are as easy on the eyes as the tools are on your muscles. From $10; radiusgarden.com

Food-growing books

Photo by E. Spencer Toy; written by Julie Chai

Food-growing books

In addition to the basics, The Essential Urban Farmer (Penguin, 2011; $25), by Novella Carpenter and Willow Rosenthal, tackles topics like beekeeping. Backyard orchard­ists will find help in Colby Eierman’s Fruit Trees in Small Spaces (Timber Press, 2012; $25). Like to eat as much as you like to garden? Willi Galloway’s Grow Cook Eat (Sasquatch Books, 2012; $30) gives a recipe for each crop.

Self-watering pots

Photo by Thomas J. Story

Self-watering pots

At last, some good-looking self-watering pots for not-quite-green-thumbs. GroBal (71/8 in., $25) and GroBal Baby (4¼ in., $15; velocityartanddesign.com).

Mobile planter

Photo by Thomas J. Story

Mobile planter

This mobile planter―ideal for decks and balconies―is made from recycled plastic milk jugs. Food Map Container (33-in.-long container on 30-in. legs, $255).

Artsy planter

Photo by Thomas J. Story

Artsy planter

Let this tiny modern planter stand alone as a sculpture―or add some greenery to create a living roof. Truss planter (4 in. tall, $51; mollaspace.com).

Watering can

Photo by Thomas J. Story

Watering can

Alessi translates an old standby into a punchy marriage of form and function, sturdy metal spout and all. Kiwi Watering Can (2 qt., $49; thegardener.com).

Portable spout

Photo by Thomas J. Story

Portable spout

This portable spout (and inspired space saver) converts a used plastic bottle into a watering can. Twist & Spout (fits 2-liter bottle, $8; at Stumasa, 415/759-1234).

Birdhouse

Photo by Thomas J. Story

Birdhouse

Inspired by 1960s Buckminster Fuller buildings, this geodesic-dome birdhouse has a backdoor for cleanout. Birdhouse by Kelly Lamb (8 in., $95; areaware.com).

Metal basket

Photo by Jeffery Cross; written by Johanna Silver

Metal basket

The galvanized mesh wire lets you hose off your produce right in the basket before carrying it, soil-free, inside (from Peaceful Valley; $40; groworganic.com).

 

Berry cartons

Photo by Jeffery Cross; written by Johanna Silver

Berry cartons

Reusable ceramic replicas of traditional farmers’-market baskets provide good air flow to keep your harvest fresh (from aHa Modern Living, from $13; ahamodernliving.com).

 

Herb drying rack

Photo by Jeffery Cross; written by Johanna Silver

Herb drying rack

Before you make tea or sachets out of your lemon verbena or lavender, you’ll need to dry the herbs, of course. Enter this useful foldaway rack (from High Country Gardens, $20; highcountrygardens.com).

 

Drying rack

Photo by Jeffery Cross; written by Johanna Silver

Drying rack

Herbs such as basil, mint, parsley, and sage dry well in single layers on a rack (clean window screens also work). When fully dry, store in airtight containers. Medium herb, flower, and bud drying rack, from $36; amazon.com

Orchard rack

Photo by Jeffery Cross; written by Johanna Silver

Orchard rack

When your crops just won’t quit, set up this wooden stand—with sliding drawers—to handle the overflow (from Gardener’s Supply, from $80; gardeners.com).

Vegetable baskets

Photo by Jeffery Cross; written by Johanna Silver

Vegetable baskets

Potatoes like to breathe; let them do so in these willow baskets in a nice cool spot (from Gardener’s Supply, $50 for set of 2; gardeners.com).

Root storage bin

Photo by Jeffery Cross; written by Johanna Silver

Root storage bin

Perfect for beets, carrots, or turnips. Fill it with alternating layers of damp sawdust and root veggies, and store in a cool, dark place. From Gardener’s Supply Company, $35; gardeners.com

Pesto jars

Photo by Jeffery Cross; written by Johanna Silver

Pesto jars

Nothing says summer like fresh pesto. Freeze some for winter in one of these airtight, BPA-free baby-food containers (from Pottery Barn Kids, $30 for set of 4; potterybarnkids.com).

Pesto cubes

Photo by Jeffery Cross; written by Johanna Silver

Pesto cubes

Freeze pesto in these airtight, BPA-free baby-food freezer trays. From Pottery Barn Kids, $20 each; potterybarnkids.com

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http://www.sunset.com/garden/landscaping-design/new-garden-tools-planters-00400000041379/