Garden staffer Lauren Dunec shows us how to make a wreath using foraged greens and foliage

Why buy a boring Christmas wreath when you can make your own gorgeous, inexpensive wreath using nature's bounty? Making a holiday wreath with foraged greens is a fun DIY project that brings the smell of the forest to your front door.

When looking for greenery, look for foliage that has various colors, textures, forms, or anything else that will add interest. A good rule of thumb is that branches from evergreens like eucalyptus, fir, and holly are going to hold up better in a wreath. When clipping larger branches, think of it like pruning. Cut just above a node facing the direction you’d like the branch to keep growing. When clipping smaller branches, just be sure to leave enough of a stem that you’ll be able to tie the foliage onto your wreath.

To make the wreath, you’ll need clippers and wrapping floral wire; you may also want to use a store-bought wire wreath frame to guide you. (In a pinch, a wire coat hanger will do.) Prep your greenery by cutting each branch into pieces 6-8 inches long. For any small branches or bunches of berries, bundle them together with a little bit of wire before adding them to the wreath. Twist one end of your wire to your wreath form and wrap a bundle of greenery. Work your way around the entire form, overlapping each bundle and tucking in berries as you go.

To create a more casual, freeform wreath, ditch the wire frame entirely and use the same principle of wrapping and overlapping foliage, working your way around the branch. A good way to start is to use a branch that has a little more structure to begin with, like an olive tree branch, as your wreath base.

When making your own wreath, just have fun with it. Love succulent wreaths? Tie a few small succulents in with the foliage. You can also use pine cones, or touch up a few leaves with gold spray paint if you want to add a little more color--anything goes! Give it a shot and we guarantee wreath making will quickly become a Christmas decorating tradition.

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