Freshest stir-fry

Enjoy home-grown stir-fry for dinner

Freshest stir-fry

'Mei Qing Choi'. Upright compact plants. When cooked the tender leaves have a sweet nutty flavor. Produces 6- to 8-inch baby bok choy in 28 days. (Source: NGN) 

Thomas J. Story

  • Green in Snow

    'Green in Snow' mustard:  Chinese leaf mustard tastes mild when young, pungent with age. 50 days. (Source: NGN)

  • Freshest stir-fry

    Mizuna: Attractive plants have tender juicy stems. Leaves have crisp texture and mild flavor with a slight nuttiness. 35 days.

  • Freshest stir-fry

    'Misome' Japanese greens: Upright plant bears tender round leaves with sweet flavor and a pungent finish. 30 days.

Renee Shepherd of Felton, California, can make dinner in 7 to 10 minutes. Her secret? She harvests fresh greens from her garden, then whips up stir-fry meals around them. She favors tender young mustard leaves, curly kale, and crunchy-stemmed baby bok choy, or pak choi. "I heat some peanut oil, throw in minced garlic and ginger, maybe some beef strips and tofu chunks. After a few minutes, I add a mix of greens and cook them quickly. Voilà ― a nice, healthy dinner."

Rose Marie Nichols McGee of Albany, Oregon, likes to stir-fry greens from different parts of the world, mixing Tuscan kale, Shanghai pak choi, and Japanese mizuna. "Greens are cross-continental, so it's one-world, one-pot cooking," she says.

Shepherd and McGee, who both own seed companies, are just two of many gardener-cooks who have discovered the pleasures of cultivating leafy greens. Growing your own from seed gives you the greatest selection. If you're intimidated by seeds, don't be ― these crops grow quickly. We tried many varieties in Sunset's test garden; our top-rated choices are pictured above.

From planting to harvest

In mild-winter climates, start seeds in August or September. In hot inland valleys or low desert areas, wait until late September or October. In cold-winter areas (Sunset climate zones 1-3), sow no later than early August, or wait until spring to plant.

Sow seeds directly in fertile soil in a sunny spot. Plant in rows according to package instructions, or broadcast seeds in blocks by variety. Cover seeds lightly with ½ inch of fine soil or compost; keep seedbed evenly moist. Protect from birds with floating row covers or netting. When the first true leaves appear, thin seedlings to 1 inch apart (use thinnings in stir-fries).

To harvest leaves, wait until plants are about 6 inches tall. Then, using scissors, cut leaves 1 to 2 inches above soil level; for baby bok choy, snap off leaves at the base. Water well and fertilize lightly with diluted fish emulsion. Plants will sprout new leaves for more harvestings.

Sources: Mix your own seeds or buy a packaged seed blend such as Renee's Stirfry Mix Pan-Pacific Greens, which contains Asian red kale, baby bok choy, mizspoona (a cross between mizuna and tatsoi), and red mustard.

Nichols Garden Nursery (NGN); 800/422-3985

Territorial Seed Company; 541/942-9547

Renee's Garden Seeds; 888/880-7228

Printed from:
http://www.sunset.com/garden/fruits-veggies/freshest-stir-fry-00400000022935/