17 favorite fragrant blossoms

Grow these bloomers to perfume your garden—and your home

Lilac (Syringa x 'Declaration')

Photo by Doreen L. Wynja; written by Kathleen N. Brenzel

Lilac

(Syringa x 'Declaration')

Star-shaped reddish purple flowers appear in large dramatic clusters in early spring. The scent is spicy sweet—the essence of spring. The deciduous shrub reaches 6 to 8 feet tall and 5 to 6 feet wide; it takes full sun, or light shade in the hottest climates. Most lilacs bloom best in regions with winter chill (Sunset climate zones A1–A3; 1–11, 14–16). In mild winter areas (zones 18–22), try Descanso Hybrids.

'Scarlet Pineapple' sage

Photo by Doreen L. Wynja; written by Sharon Cohoon

'Scarlet Pineapple' sage

(Salvia elegans)

This shrubby perennial reaches 4 feet tall, and has bright red flowers and foliage that smells like ripe pineapple.  Zones 5-24.

Lemon verbena

Photo by Thomas J. Story; written by Sharon Cohoon

Lemon verbena

(Aloysia triphylla)

A tall, lanky deciduous shrub, it has lemon-scented leaves and lilac or white flowers. Zones 9, 10, 12-21.

Angelwing jasmine

Photo by Doreen L. Wynja; written by Sharon Cohoon

Angelwing jasmine

(Jasminum laurifolium nitidum)

This semi-evergreen vine has glossy green leaves and pinwheel-shaped white flowers. Sunset climate zones 12, 16, 19-24, H1, H2.

Heliotrope

Photo by Proven Winners; written by Sharon Cohoon

Heliotrope

(Heliotropium arborescens)

Though the purple varieties are more common, the white-flowered form is the most fragrant. Perennial in zones 15-17, 23, 24, H1, H2; annual elsewhere.

Roses

Photo by Doreen L. Wynja; written by Sharon Cohoon

Roses

Many old types--including Bourbon, China, and damask--are fragrant, and more and more modern varieties, such as 'Yves Piaget', are too. Zones vary by species.

Lemon-scented geraniums

Photo by Kimberly Navabpour; written by Sharon Cohoon

Lemon-scented geraniums

Look for the variety 'Prince Rupert' or 'Mabel Gray'. Perennial in Sunset climate zones 8, 9, 12-24; grow elsewhere as annual.

Mock orange

Photo by Andrea Jones/Garden Exposures Photo Library; written by Sharon Cohoon

Mock orange

(Philadelphus coronarius)

White four-petaled flowers cover this tall shrub. Sunset climate zones A1-A3, 1a, 2-24.

Angel's trumpet

Photo by Thomas J. Story; written by Sharon Cohoon

Angel's trumpet

(Brugmansia)

A woody shrub, it has pendant flowers in a range of colors. Most varieties are fragrant, but 'Charles Grimaldi' is the best. Zones 12, 13, 16-24, H1, H2.

Tuberose

Photo by Thomas J. Story; written by Sharon Cohoon

Tuberose

(Polianthes tuberosa) 

This perennial has a fountain of grassy leaves and glistening white tubular flowers. Zones 7-9, 14-24, H1, H2.

Flowering plum (Prunus cerasifera)

Photo by Ernst Kucklich; written by Kathleen N. Brenzel

Flowering plum

(Prunus cerasifera)

Single white to light pink flowers open in clusters from pinkish buds before leaves appear (in March in the Northwest, earlier in warmer climes), releasing a honey scent, especially on warm, sunny days. The tree, 20 to 30 feet tall and wide, likes full sun. ‘Thundercloud’ has purplish brown leaves. Zones 3–22.

Star magnolia (Magnolia stellata 'Royal Star')

Photo by Ernst Kucklich; written by Kathleen N. Brenzel

Star magnolia

(Magnolia stellata 'Royal Star')

Pink buds open to white star-shaped flowers in early spring. The scent is subtly sweet with a hint of citrus. The slow-growing deciduous shrub or small tree (to 20 feet tall) blossoms in early spring before the plant leafs out. It likes sun or part shade. Zones 2b–9, 14–24.

 

Polyanthus jasmine (Jasminum polyanthum)

Photo by Thomas J. Story; written by Kathleen N. Brenzel

Polyanthus jasmine

(Jasminum polyanthum)

Small rose-colored flowers are white inside and grow in dense clusters in late winter to early spring. The scent is sweet and floral, like a warm Hawaiian night. A climbing vine reaching 20 feet tall, it’s sometimes grown in big pots and hanging baskets, or used as a groundcover. This jasmine takes full sun or light shade. Zones 5–9, 12–24; H1.

 

Citrus

Photo by fourwindsgrowers.com; written by Kathleen N. Brenzel

Citrus

Creamy white blossoms of ‘Washington’ navel orange have a rich, fruity perfume that seems to float in the warm spring air. ‘Eureka’ lemon has at least some flowers nearly all year. Grow both in sun. Zones 8, 9, 12–24; H1–H2.

Mexican orange (Choisya ternata)

Photo by Linda L. Peters; written by Kathleen N. Brenzel

Mexican orange

(Choisya ternata)

Small white flowers smell like orange blossoms with a hint of gardenia. The evergreen shrub (not a true citrus) reaches 6 to 8 feet tall, and takes sun in cooler climates but part shade elsewhere. Zones 6–9, 14–24.

How to bring the scent inside

Photo by Janis Nicolay; written by Kathleen N. Brenzel

How to bring the scent inside

Cutting. The best time to cut stems and branches is in the early morning or evening when the air is cool. Use sharp pruners.

 Roses: Make cuts above a set of five leaves.

 Shrubs: Cut flowers that grow in clusters, such as lilac and mock orange, before all buds have opened.

 Trees: Clip branches when buds start to fatten, making cuts just above a growth bud (take care not to disfigure your tree).

 Vines: Snip flowering stems of polyanthus jasmine, and remove the lowest leaves and blooms.

Caring. As you cut, plunge all branches or stems immediately in a bucket of lukewarm water. Before arranging woody ones (including flowering plum, lilac, and magnolia), remove the lower leaves, recut the stem ends at a slant, and make a 1- to 2-inch slit through the bottom of each stem.

Preserving. Fill a vase with lukewarm water, then add a floral preservative before inserting cuttings. Keep arrangements out of direct sunlight, and change the water and recut stem ends as needed.

Printed from:
http://www.sunset.com/garden/flowers-plants/spring-blooms-00418000070941/