10 ways to cook with tea

Jasmine, darjeeling, oolong: they're great for sipping, sure—but put tea in recipes, and you have a whole different way to enjoy its fragrance and flavor

Smoked Tea Duck

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Eric Gower

Smoked Tea Duck

There’s nothing like authentic tea-smoked duck, but the smoking process can overwhelm many home kitchens. Enter “smoked tea duck”—using lapsang souchong tea and uncooked rice to make a smoky, crispy crust for duck breast, which is then pan-fried in its own fat.

Recipe: Smoked Tea Duck

Rooibos Butternut “Pizzettas”

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Eric Gower

Rooibos Butternut “Pizzettas”

Think of these roasted squash rounds as tiny pizzas: You bake them and add any topping you like. They tend to go fast at parties.

Recipe: Rooibos Butternut “Pizzettas”

Crisp Genmaicha Tofu with Shiitakes and Savoy Cabbage

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Eric Gower

Crisp Genmaicha Tofu with Shiitakes and Savoy Cabbage

The cabbage and the mushrooms simmer in brewed genmaicha until tender, absorbing the delicate, toasty tea. The tea leaf–crusted tofu deepens those flavors.

Recipe: Crisp Genmaicha Tofu with Shiitakes and Savoy Cabbage

Jasmine Chicken Soup with Green Tea Soba

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Eric Gower

Jasmine Chicken Soup with Green Tea Soba

Feel free to use other vegetables. And if you have extra broth, simmer more vegetables in it the next day for a nearly instant soup.

Recipe: Jasmine Chicken Soup with Green Tea Soba

Darjeeling Dashi

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Eric Gower

Darjeeling Dashi

Use this quick version of Japanese dashi (soup stock) to deglaze pans, for soup, and to make rice (use half water, half dashi).

Recipe: Darjeeling Dashi

Matcha Whoopie Pies

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Eric Gower

Matcha Whoopie Pies

I grew up inhaling whoopie pies, bless my mother’s soul. Although I would like to offer her recipe, I’m afraid that just reading the quantity of trans fats (Crisco) called for might incite cardiac arrest! This healthier version tastes even better.

Recipe: Matcha Whoopie Pies

Chai-Spiced Shortbread Cookies

Photo by Alex Farnum; written by Margo True

Chai-Spiced Shortbread Cookies

These cookies may look humble, but they have a wonderfully complex flavor, thanks to the chai (Indian spiced tea) seasonings: cinnamon, ginger, fennel, and cardamom. The shortbread dough gives them a crisp, buttery texture.

Recipe: Chai-Spiced Shortbread Cookies

 

Cran-Berry Green-Tea Smoothie

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Margo True

Cran-Berry Green-Tea Smoothie

This is one of our favorite New Year's resolution recipes: it's loaded with antioxidants, is easy to make, and it tastes delicious, too. Slurp down one of these and you'll have the energy you need for a nice long hike or bike ride.

Recipe: Cran-Berry Green-Tea Smoothie

Blackberry-Black Tea Sorbet

Photo by Scott Peterson; written by Margo True

Blackberry-Black Tea Sorbet

For a refreshing dessert after a rich winter dinner, try this gorgeous sorbet (use thawed frozen blackberries). It's wonderful in summer, too, during blackberry season.

Recipe:  Blackberry-Black Tea Sorbet 

Chai-Cherry Walnuts

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Margo True

Chai-Cherry Walnuts

Cinnamon, cardamom, cloves, and ginger–typical spices for chai (Indian-style black tea)—are mixed with walnuts and tart dried cherries to make a sensational topper for oatmeal.

Recipe: Chai-Cherry Walnuts

Jasmine (China)

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Eric Gower

Plus: Best types of tea for cooking

Jasmine (China) 

Most often made with green tea; scented with jasmine flowers. Aromatic and elegant.

Darjeeling (India)

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Eric Gower

Darjeeling (India)

Black tea from the northern part of the country. Delicate, complex.

Lapsang souchong (China and Taiwan)

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Eric Gower

Lapsang souchong (China and Taiwan)

Black tea that’s been smoked to varying degrees, most often over green pine wood or needles. Powerfully smoky and fragrant.

Genmaicha (Japan)

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Eric Gower

Genmaicha (Japan)

A green tea mixed with toasted brown rice (aka brown rice tea). Sometimes the rice kernel inverts during toasting, creating popcornlike bits. Nutty and earthy.

Matcha (Japan)

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Eric Gower

Matcha (Japan)

Green tea ground to a jade green powder. Keep chilled, airtight, because it’s extremely perishable. Sweet, floral, and velvety smooth.

Rooibos (South Africa)

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Eric Gower

Rooibos (South Africa)

The dried leaves of a native South African shrub, it’s technically an herbal tea. Fruity and mild; sometimes called red tea.

Printed from:
http://www.sunset.com/food-wine/kitchen-assistant/tea-recipes-00418000074464/