6 ravishing radish recipes

Sharp and crunchy, radishes are a refreshing bite of spring. Savor them in these hors d'oeuvres and salads

Radishes with Butter and Sea Salt

Photography by Thomas J. Story

Radishes with Butter and Sea Salt

Cut wedges out of 24 radishes, pack the space with unsalted butter, and dip buttered sides in sea salt.

Makes: 24 

Time: 20 minutes

Watermelon Radish and Goat Cheese Salad

Photo by Annabelle Breakey

Watermelon Radish and Goat Cheese Salad

A watermelon radish is, on first glance, a plain greenish-white root. But slice it open and it reveals a stunning fuchsia interior. We love their mild flavor in this simple salad.

Recipe: Watermelon Radish and Goat Cheese Salad 

Icebox Salad

Photo by Leo Gong

Icebox Salad

Believe it or not, this salad improves after a few hours in the refrigerator. The dressing works its way into the peas, cucumbers, and radishes, the flavors meld, and the vegetables become sweeter.

Recipe: Icebox Salad 

Nori Radish Toasts

Photo by Iain Bagwell; written by Amy Machnak

Nori Radish Toasts

Radishes and butter are a classic pairing. It's taken an Asian detour with the earthy, nutty flavor of nori added.

Recipe: Nori Radish Toasts

Radish and Sorrel Salad

Photo by Leo Gong; written by Stephanie Dean

Radish and Sorrel Salad

For a mere handful of green leaves, sorrel packs a powerful culinary punch. When paired with radishes and a bit of ginger, its fresh, lemony, herbaceous flavor lets you know that spring is finally here. 

Recipe: Radish and Sorrel Salad

Radishes, fresh homemade butter, and salt

Radishes, Fresh Homemade Butter, and Salt

This classic French hors d’oeuvre could not be easier: Put firm, juicy radishes on a platter (cut larger ones in half) and serve with fine sea salt and butter, homemade or store-bought.

Homemade butter tastes sweeter and fresher than ordinary store-bought butter—and so does the buttermilk that’s left over. To make it, whirl 2 cups heavy cream (preferably not ultra-pasteurized) in a food processor until it separates into buttermilk and clumps of butter—they’ll look like fluffy scrambled eggs. Keep whirling until butter forms bigger clumps, about 3 minutes. Pour mixture into a strainer (set over a bowl if you want to keep the buttermilk) and let drain briefly. Squeeze butter to extract remaining buttermilk (it’s okay if a little is left). Put butter into a second bowl and stir in fine sea salt to taste, if you like.

 

Printed from:
http://www.sunset.com/food-wine/kitchen-assistant/radish-recipes-00418000078803/